Review: Everyday Paleo Italian Cuisine

Cover1-for-blog-postFor anyone who is a fan of Italian food, a Paleo diet seems virtually incompatible with life. Pasta, pizza, and parmesan cheese are some of the top foods that would be banned on a gluten-free, dairy-free diet, and most people new to Paleo assume that they’ll never be able to enjoy an authentic Italian meal ever again.

Some folks may even choose to forgo starting a Paleo diet for fear of missing out on their favorite Italian foods for the rest of their lives. It’s a fairly common complaint among those who are resistant to making major dietary changes. Fortunately, Sarah Fragoso has come to the rescue with her new cookbook, “Everyday Paleo Around the World: Italian Cuisine.”

Italian lovers rejoice: your favorite traditional Italian foods are now gluten, grain, and dairy free! Tweet This

This new cookbook is inspired by Sarah’s travels around Italy, experiencing the authentic cuisine of the country. Perhaps unsurprisingly, as Sarah explains in her new cookbook, bread, pizza, and pasta are not typically the main dishes enjoyed in traditional Italian food. According to Sarah, certain dishes like Fettuccine Alfredo aren’t even authentic recipes, and most Italians have never even heard of the dish, despite its popularity in the United States. Traditionally, Italians have used plenty of wild fish, local meats and produce, and freshly-pressed olive oil in their cooking (and of course they drink plenty of wine!) So the transition from authentic Italian to health-conscious Paleo is less challenging than it might appear, and far more delicious than might be expected.

Sarah uses her experience of the rich culture of Italy to inform her recipe development, and the results are better than the food you’ll find in most 5 star Italian restaurants. The best part is that all of the dishes are gluten, dairy, and legume-free; no easy feat for an entirely Italian cookbook that includes recipes like gnocchi, spaghetti carbonara, baked ziti, lasagna, and even tiramisu. And for those who prefer lower carbohydrate dishes, Sarah includes dishes like meatballs, osso bucco, slow cooked pork belly, and bruschetta served on hard salami instead of (grain-free) bread. There’s truly something for every Italian food fanatic in this book!

Amongst her descriptions of her family’s experience traveling the Italian countryside, Sarah provides one hundred unique recipes for any occasion. The book features appetizers, pizza, side dishes, soups, entrees, and even dessert. For the adventurous reader, Sarah shares her recommendations for where to go and what to do if planning a trip to Italy, including how to stay gluten-free. After reading through the recipes, I’m sure many will be inspired to visit Italy in future travels. I know I am.

Sarah’s book is available on Amazon now, so if you’re salivating over the thought of enjoying homemade lasagna, authentic, “Paleo” Italian recipes are just a click away!

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Comments Join the Conversation

  1. Joyce says

    Great timing! I just received my copy of Sarah’s book today and am literally salivating. It is beautiful both in design and content! Can’t wait to try the recipes!

  2. Mitch Parker says

    This book is interesting. I love Italian cuisines but I don’t have any idea that it’s really healthy. Anyway, thanks so much for sharing! :-)

  3. Angela says

    I just ordered this book from Amazon last week, and I gaurantee it will be the most used cookbook in my home going forward – especially because my Italian husband pretty much only likes Italian food! Thanks for sharing!

  4. says

    “According to Sarah, certain dishes like Fettuccine Alfredo aren’t even authentic recipes, and most Italians have never even heard of the dish…”

    Right. Because they call it “fettucine al burro.”

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