The Roundup

Roundup

Here is The Roundup, Edition 24, bringing you the best from around the web from the past two weeks!

Blast from the Past

Recently, a blog called SuppVersity explained that overtraining is a real phenomenon, and that it leads to significant changes in muscle hormones and proteins. The author explains how during the early phases, sympathetic overtraining may feel like being overstimulated, which leads to serious fatigue, episodes of hypoglycemia during (and after) exercise, and other serious consequences including depression, impaired immunity, and muscle breakdown. While exercise is an important part of an overall healthy lifestyle, this article makes it clear that overtraining is just as unhealthy as undertraining.

Exercise is a major component of a healthy lifestyle, and the benefits of regular physical activity are well established. However, there are many people who take their physique and physical fitness to an extreme level. Certain styles of exercise take the participant to a state of physical exhaustion on a regular basis, which may do more harm than good. This is unfortunately common among many in the Paleo community, who often participate in high volume, intense training programs.

To learn more about overtraining, including signs, symptoms, and how to prevent this common problem from happening, check out my article from 2012 about why you may need to exercise less.

Research Report

  • Green tea contains the amino acid L-Theanine, which is associated with a reduction in anxiety and also weakens the rise in blood pressure in high-stress-response adults.
  • Those who regularly consumed fish or other omega-3 rich food exhibited a decreased risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.
  • Coffee, when consumed in moderation, provides similar hydrating qualities to water.
  • Eating at least two servings of seafood per week during pregnancy has beneficial effects on child development, including higher IQ in children.
  • Eating a tailored diet based on your blood type (i.e. O+) provides no health benefits, despite a popular naturopathic belief.
  • Uncorking the muse: Alcohol intoxication facilitates creative problem solving.

Worth A Look

  • Free the Animal explains the evidence that suggests humans have been eating starch for a very long time–even in the Ice Age.
  • I don’t agree with Katz on everything, but this is an excellent editorial in response to Gary Taubes’ recent piece in the NY Times.
  • Mark Sisson takes a primal look at art therapy.
  • Amy Kubal bravely shares her ongoing struggle with an eating disorder.
  • HuffPo describes the nine essential habits of the mentally strong.

For the Foodies

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Comments Join the Conversation

  1. rs711 says

    “an excellent editorial” – you stumped be Chris, you really did. I genuinely respect & admire your opinions & work – but this praise to Katz’s response is not only wrong, but worrying.

    Please read my quick comments [a re-post from FTA] concerning Katzs’ response and tell your readers again that this was “an excellent editorial”.

    Excerpts from Katz’s rant (yes, angry rant).

    “we probably really knew all along that “low fat” advice really meant eat more mixed greens” – that has to be one of the weakest arguments I’ve seen in a while…

    “As a formally trained clinical researcher myself who has run a lab for nearly 20 years and published roughly 200 scientific papers” – why appeal to authority/credentials if your argument/reasoning is solid & verifiable? LAME

    “NEVER EVEN REDUCED OUR FAT INTAKE!” – happy to ignore the types of fat that replaced the ‘naturally’ occurring ones our grandparents ate? I thought so…

    “we increased our total calorie intake” – question is WHY? Katz is going around in circles —> ‘we’re fat because we eat more, we eat more because we’re fat, we’re fat because we eat more…..’ you get the idea. Again, GREAT contributions Katz! [sarcasm for those with an intact blood-brain barrier]

    “I would argue we are not, and were not confused – we are, and were conflicted” —> I am [confused]. I’m still trying to understand the Inuit & the Kitavans. I can try to guess at the subtleties between his intended distinction between ‘confusion’ & being ‘conflicted’…but this detracts from the argument, making me more……..confused, or conflicted? Damn.

    “Mr. Taubes is one of many New-Age nutrition Messiahs who have spawned a thriving cottage industry in iconoclastic messages” —> well that is simply an ad-hominem attack which calls for an equally measured response = bullshit.

    “We knew that “cut fat” meant eat more kale; we just pretended it didn’t” —> anyone know what kind of crazy home-grown he’s on? I’d love to pass one of those around…

    “Mr. Taubes and others like him- the iconoclasts out to save us from our confusion […] They can go on indefinitely under a veil of pseudo-erudition generating seemingly impressive answers to fatuous questions —-> Katz’s own book is called…? “DISEASE PROOF” Wow, just…wow

    • einstein says

      thanks, you picked up all the weaknesses of his rant, so I don’t have to :-) . that article is just a load of BS nothing else. taubes is the man.

  2. Wenchypoo says

    Using the blood type diet for awhile, then going off it, helped me discover I had WAY more food sensitivities and allergies than I ever realized–for example: I never knew I had a problem with legumes until I restricted their intake to what the diet recommendations were for my blood type (mung and adzuki beans)–both of which I had never eaten before until then. Same for oranges and tomatoes.

    Since going off the diet, I now feel a quickening of the pulse, as well as sneezing, and sometimes redness of the extremities every time I eat so much as a green bean. Moving from the blood type diet to the Paleo diet helps me avoid the majority of foods that offend me.

    One complaint/bugaboo i had with the blood type diet was grains: in spite of what the grain type recommendations were, and in spite of preparing them in the WAPF method (soaking 24 hrs. in an acid medium), I was still having trouble with them. This is why I moved onto Paleo and outright avoidance.

    I haven’t lost much weight, but I no longer sneeze, red-hand, or quick-pulse my way through life. My once chronically-swollen sinuses and palate thanked me–now I have my natural voice back!

    • einstein says

      you do know the blood type diet is a nonsense, don’t you?nevertheless if it pushed you in the right direction, it served its purpose.

  3. rs711 says

    “this is an excellent editorial” ??
    You may disagree with Taubes’ view on carbohydrates (as do I) but expressing that as a compliment to Katzs’ response is very disappointing.
    [below is a re-post from my comment on FTA]

    – Excerpts from Katz’s rant (yes, angry rant).

    “we probably really knew all along that “low fat” advice really meant eat more mixed greens” – that has to be one of the weakest arguments I’ve seen in a while…

    “As a formally trained clinical researcher myself who has run a lab for nearly 20 years and published roughly 200 scientific papers” – why appeal to authority/credentials if your argument/reasoning is solid & verifiable? LAME

    “NEVER EVEN REDUCED OUR FAT INTAKE!” – happy to ignore the types of fat that replaced the ‘naturally’ occurring ones our grandparents ate? I thought so…

    “we increased our total calorie intake” – question is WHY? Katz is going around in circles —> ‘we’re fat because we eat more, we eat more because we’re fat, we’re fat because we eat more…..’ you get the idea. Again, GREAT contributions Katz! [sarcasm for those with an intact blood-brain barrier]

    “I would argue we are not, and were not confused – we are, and were conflicted” —> I am [confused]. I’m still trying to understand the Inuit & the Kitavans. I can try to guess at the subtleties between his intended distinction between ‘confusion’ & being ‘conflicted’…but this detracts from the argument, making me more……..confused, or conflicted? Damn.

    “Mr. Taubes is one of many New-Age nutrition Messiahs who have spawned a thriving cottage industry in iconoclastic messages” —> well that is simply an ad-hominem attack which calls for an equally measured response = bullshit.

    “We knew that “cut fat” meant eat more kale; we just pretended it didn’t” —> anyone know what kind of crazy home-grown he’s on? I’d love to pass one of those around…

    “Mr. Taubes and others like him- the iconoclasts out to save us from our confusion […] They can go on indefinitely under a veil of pseudo-erudition generating seemingly impressive answers to fatuous questions —-> Katz’s own book is called…? “DISEASE PROOF” Wow, just…wow

    Thanks for pointing to the article out RN, but my head hurts now and my faith in the “established nutrition/obesity researchers” has dropped lower still.

    • einstein says

      paleoized junkfood is still junkfood. way to many seeds and fruits in it. that load of omega 6 PUFAS would be enough for a week or even two. not to mention the load of fructose in it. this must be pretty sweet, which paleo is not. vegetarians would love it, i guess :-)

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