The Roundup

Roundup

Here is The Roundup, Edition 50, bringing you the best health research and paleo recipes from around the web over the past two weeks.

RHR: A Beginner’s Guide to Scientific Research

RHR-new-cover-lowres

There is good research and there is bad research, and there’s a tremendous gulf between the two. It is possible to evaluate research based on its own merits and, with some training and some attention, to determine whether a study is a good study or a bad study and whether we can rely, therefore, on its conclusions.

When Gluten-Free Is Not a Fad

gluten-free

Gluten intolerance is “fake”—at least according to many recent news stories. But what does scientific research have to say on this topic? Is going gluten-free just a crazy fad? Is gluten intolerance over-hyped as the media claims, or is it a legitimate condition that may be even more common than currently recognized?

Why Are Scientists and the Public So Often At Odds?

scientist

I recently listened to a program on NPR’s Science Friday called “Scientists and the Public Disagree on Key Issues.” The gist of it was that although a consensus has been reached among scientists on issues like nutrition, vaccination, genetically-modified foods (GMOs), and climate change, the general public often disregards their advice. Not surprisingly, the position taken by the scientists interviewed on the program was that this disconnect between scientists and the general public is mostly… Read More

The Roundup

Roundup

Blast from the Past Recent evidence suggests dietary advice to limit red meat is unnecessarily restrictive and may have unintended health consequences. As people have been avoiding red meat, food trends suggest that they have been replacing unprocessed red meat with unhealthy fats and refined carbohydrates, potentially contributing to the rapid rise in the prevalence of obesity since the 1970s as well as other risk factors for heart disease and/or metabolic syndrome. Avoiding red meat… Read More