The Roundup - Edition 56

The Roundup

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Here is The Roundup, Edition 56, bringing you the best health research and paleo recipes from around the web over the past two weeks.

Blast from the Past

Healthy skin doesn’t require pricey moisturizers, but it does help to watch what you put in your gut. Good Magazine recently ran a story on the way your diet affects your skin health, focusing on not only the obvious – like removing junk food and alcohol and drinking enough water – but also getting healthy fats and nutrient-dense foods as well.

I was quoted in their section on the benefits of probiotic foods and supplements for boosting skin health, referring to this article I wrote back in 2012. As many of you know (if you’ve been following my work for any length of time), the gut-brain-skin axis is one I’ve written about frequently, and in my work with patients I often see men and women with problematic skin conditions that are vastly improved once gut health is attended to.

In fact, skin issues like acne, eczema, and psoriasis are often the first signs that something pathological is going on in the gut, even in the absence of digestive symptoms.

For more information about improving your skin health using good nutrition and supporting gut health, check out my eBook on the topic. In this book, you’ll learn how certain nutrients and probiotic strains have been shown to improve skin health from the inside out.

Research Report

  • A new study shows that sleep can help a person overcome memory deficits caused by a concussion.
  • Caffeine may help you stay cool in stressful times – but it’s not the best way to manage stress.
  • Antibiotic treatment in childhood is associated with higher diabetes risk later in life.
  • Higher proportions of people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity have autoimmune disease or anti-nuclear antibodies compared to people with IBS.
  • Iron fortification adversely affects gut microbiome, increases pathogen abundance, and induces intestinal inflammation.
  • Emerging evidence is suggesting that our gut bugs may actually regulate the physiological process of controlling blood pressure

Worth a Look

  • This dad set up a CrossFit-inspired obstacle course on his property so he can keep fit while also spending time with his family.
  • Most of the world only consumes four of the 30,000+ edible plants found on Earth. Read more to discover which four.
  • It’s important to balance exercise with safety while on vacation.
  • Only about 30 medical schools around the country teach culinary medicine.  
  • Sleep is a great early warning beacon to alert us to the beginnings of Alzheimer’s.
  • Practicing meditation and mindfulness can increase the amount of gray matter in your brain. 
  • If you are training correctly, your fitness and performance will skyrocket faster.
  • Misleading ads aimed at kids are a big piece of the obesity puzzle.
  • If you must work a night shift, here is a good resource for how to survive it and stay healthy. 
  • Raised cholesterol level is not a risk factor for stroke – and statins aren’t the cure-all. 
  • One unexpected use for coconut oil: to stop bug bites from itching. As the weather warms up outdoors this tip will come in handy! 
  • Be careful what you read about health and nutrition, it may not be as evidence-based as you think!

For the Foodies

  1. The “Healthy Skin” article cited at the beginning was very interesting. It seemed to focus on how to keep the skin healthy as an organ. One thing it didn’t mention that I think is important is that the skin is an excretory organ. It helps rid the body of toxins. (Yes, it can also absorb toxins, but that’s another subject).

    So when people see “unhealthy skin” it may not be the skin health they see, but the excretions. The excretions, in turn, may be a sign of an unhealthy body. This goes for excreted smells as well as visual substances.

    And skin health can also be worsened because of excess substances that are being excreted. For instance, according to some experts, Psoriasis is nothing other than excessive shedding skin due to the need to remove toxins. So it looks bad, but it’s a sign of something far worse than a skin problem. It signals a gut problem. Leaky gut allows entry of the toxins and many of these toxins get far enough into the whole body that the only efficient outlet is via the skin. The toxins can’t be expelled fast enough in the case of Psoriasis, so the epidermis is shed faster (in just days instead of weeks) to keep up with the problem.

  2. “Most of the world only consumes four of the 30,000+ edible plants found on Earth. Read more to discover which four.”

    The post says no such thing. It says 60% of world energy intake comes from the four plants. Considering that non-starchy vegetables are comparatively low in calories, this is not surprising.

    • Absolutely right. Neither the blurb above nor the body of the article to which it is linked says that most of the world consumes only four vegetables. I left a comment there noting that it makes sense that starchy plants provide most of the ENERGY for humans worldwide — they are among the most calorie-dense vegetables. There is a big difference between nutrition and energy — non-starchy plants high in micronutrients are typically very low in calories. One large baked potato (10.5 oz.) provides 278 calories, while a 10.5 ounce portion of diced tomatoes has 63 calories.

  3. Hi Chris, about the iron fortification study – does that mean that the same pathogenic changes occur when eating a high iron diet from any source, even food? I tend toward anemia and supplement with Blood Builder, a whole food supplement. I also eat a lot of clams around the time of menstruation, since that is the source of my on and off anemia. So, are these practices as potentially damaging? I would really appreciate a response since this is something I am going to likely have to do for a while.

  4. hey, Chris. Any insights on skin cancers and gut health, “leaky skin”? It kinda makes sense in a way that inflammation is probably a kickstart for many or most cancers.